Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-2022

Abstract

Joseph Grinnell designed the Natural History of the Vertebrates (NHV) course at the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California at Berkeley, over 100 years ago and the course has changed little over these years. In this essay, I connect modern pedagogical and cognitive understandings of what we know leads to success among students to the course. This analysis reveals that the course continues to be successful because it has all the elements of a student-centered, active-learning class that leads to better cognitive gains, better retention, and importantly, proportionately better gains for students from underserved populations. This study will be important for advocates of teaching natural history in biology curriculum.

Joseph Grinnell diseñó el curso de Historia Natural de los Vertebrados (NHV) en el Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, Universidad de California en Berkeley, hace más de 100 años y el curso ha cambiado poco durante estos años. En este ensayo, conecto la comprensión pedagógica y cognitiva moderna de lo que sabemos que conduce al éxito entre los estudiantes del curso. Este análisis revela que el curso continúa siendo exitoso porque tiene todos los elementos de una clase de aprendizaje activo centrada en el estudiante que conduce a mejores ganancias cognitivas, mejor retención y, lo que es más importante, proporcionalmente mejores ganancias para los estudiantes de poblaciones desatendidas. Este estudio será importante para los defensores de la enseñanza de la historia natural en el plan de estudios de biología.

DOI

10.12933/therya-22-1104

Publication Information

Therya

Included in

Biology Commons

Share

COinS