Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-2006

Abstract

Hyper-reflexia, measured as a decrease of low frequency-dependent depression of the H-reflex, is known to occur in both humans and animals after spinal cord injury (SCI). Previous studies have shown that passive exercise for 3 months could be used to restore low frequency-dependent depression of the H-reflex after SCI. To determine the effects of various periods of time on the ability of passive exercise to restore low frequency-dependent depression of the H-reflex. Spinal Cord Injury Mobilization Program of the Center for Translational Neuroscience, the research arm of the Jackson T Stephens Spine and Neuroscience Institute, Little Rock, AR, USA. Adult rats underwent complete spinal cord transection at the T10 level. The hindlimbs were passively exercised in different groups of rats for 1 h/day, 5 days/week for 15, 30, 45, 60, or 90 days, and low frequency-dependent depression of the H-reflex was tested. Statistically significant low frequency-dependent depression of the H-reflex was evident by 30 days of exercise, although numerical reductions were seen even at 15 days. There was a linear decrease in low frequency-dependent depression of the H-reflex with duration of passive exercise. Passive exercise can restore frequency-dependent depression of spinal reflexes in a time-dependent manner if used following complete spinal transection.

Document Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1038/sj.sc.3101810

Publisher

Springer Nature

Publication Information

Spinal Cord

Included in

Chemistry Commons

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