Title

The Acts of the Apostles, Narrative, and History

Document Type

Contribution to Book

Publication Date

2016

Abstract

The Acts of the Apostles offers a kind of sequel to Gospel of Luke, telling the story of the spread of the Jesus movement through the activities of key leaders, beginning in Jerusalem, moving westward into the Aegean region, and finally to Rome, the imperial center. Narrative approaches have been instrumental in turning attention to how the author tells the story using the tools of narrative—plot, characterization, and so on—as well as to how the author’s use of linguistic and cultural codes would have been heard by ancient readers. This chapter explores the importance of this westward geographical movement in Acts and, through a reading of the story of Paul’s visit to Philippi (Acts 16:11–40), looks at the ways in which the author of Acts adapts narrative conventions to highlight particular moments in the progression.

Document Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199967728.013.28

Editor

Danna Nolan Fewell

Publisher

Oxford University Press

City

New York

ISBN

9780199967728

Publication Information

The Oxford Handbook of Biblical Narrative

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